{{--@foreach($getDepartments as $depts)--}}
{{-- ucwords($depts->title) --}}
{{--@endforeach--}}
Pregnancy Superfoods
2018-07-11 13:59:10

During pregnancy, healthy foods provide the optimum mix of baby-building nutrients. Starting in the second trimester, you'll need about 300 additional calories in your diet every day.

ExpressBuy is your (fastest and lowest priced) online retailer that specializes on the sale of Baby Products amongst other things. As a result, we have become experts in understanding everything about Baby from Conception to Birth to Maturity.

We found an interesting article that adequately explains what pregnancy superfoods entail.

Here are some choice foods to add to your pregnancy diet, making those extra calories count by providing a variety of nutrients that benefit you and your unborn child.

Beans

  • Why: Chickpeas, lentils, black beans, and soybeans supply fiber, protein, iron, folate, calcium, and zinc.
  • Enjoy: In chili and soups, salads, and pasta dishes; as hummus with whole-grain crackers or in roll-up sandwiches.

Beef

  • Why: Lean cuts of beef, such as top sirloin steak, pack protein, vitaminsB6, B12, and niacin, as well as zinc and iron, in highly absorbable forms. Beef is also rich in choline, which is required for brain development and peak cognitive powers.
  • Enjoy: Add lean ground beef to pasta sauces, use in tacos, as burgers, in stir-fry dishes, and in chili.

Berries

  • Why: They're packed with carbohydrates, vitamin C, potassium, folate, fiber, and fluid. The phytonutrients in berries are naturally occurring beneficial plant compounds that protect cells from damage.
  • Enjoy: On top of whole-grain cereal, in smoothies made with yogurt or milk, in pancakes, and in salads. Layer yogurt with berries and crunchy whole-grain cereal for a dessert parfait.

Broccoli

  • Why: For the folate, fiber, calcium, lutein, zeaxanthin, carotenoids to foster healthy vision, and potassium for fluid balance and normal blood pressure; broccoli also contains the raw materials for vitamin Aproduction in the body.
  • Enjoy: As part of pasta and stir-fry dishes, steamed and topped with a smattering of olive oil, pureed and added to soups, or roasted: chop broccoli into bite-sized pieces, coat lightly with olive oil and roast on a baking sheet at 400 degrees Fahrenheit until tender, about 15 minutes.

Cheese (pasteurized)

  • Why: Cheese supplies concentrated amounts of calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium for your bones and your baby's, plus vitamin B12 and protein (use reduced-fat varieties, such as Cabot 50% Light Cheddar to save on calories, fat, and cholesterol).
  • Enjoy: As snacks with whole-grain crackers or fruit, sprinkled on top of soups, in salads, sandwiches, and omelets

Eggs

  • Why: Eggs supply the gold-standard of protein, because they provide all of the amino acids you and your baby need to thrive. They also include more than a dozen vitamins and minerals, such as choline, lutein, and zeaxanthin. Certain brands supply the omega-3 fats baby needs for brain development and peak vision, so check the label.
  • Enjoy: In omelets and frittatas, in salads and sandwiches, in homemade waffles, crepes, and whole-grain French toast, as snacks, hard-cooked, or scrambled

Milk

  • Why: It's an excellent source of calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D -- bone-building nutrients mother and child require every day. Milk also packs protein, vitamin A, and B vitamins.
  • Enjoy: Plain or flavored, in smoothies made with fruit, over whole-grain cereal and fruit, and in pudding; prepare oatmeal in the microwave with milk instead of water.

Orange Juice (fortified)

  • Why: Orange juice with added calcium and vitamin D contains the same levels of these nutrients as milk. Plus, orange juice supplies hefty doses of vitamin C, potassium, and folate.
  • Enjoy: Plain or frozen as pops or ice cubes, as part of smoothies.

Pork Tenderloin

  • Why: Pork tenderloin is as lean as boneless, skinless chicken breast, and it serves up the B vitamins thiamin and niacin, vitamin B6, zinc, iron, and choline.
  • Enjoy: Grilled, broiled, or baked.

Salmon

  • Why: For the protein, B vitamins, and the omega-3 fats that promote brain development and vision in babies
  • Enjoy: Grilled or broiled, use canned salmon in salads and sandwiches.

Sweet Potato

  • Why: Sweet potatoes pack vitamin C, folate, fiber, and carotenoids -- compounds your body converts to vitamin A. They also supply potassium in large amounts.
  • Enjoy: Baked, sliced cold, cooked, peeled potatoes for snacks and side dishes, mashed with orange juice, and roasted: slice washed sweet potato into wedges, coat lightly with canola oil, and roast on a baking sheet at 400 degrees Fahrenheit until tender, about 15 to 20 minutes.

Whole Grains

  • Why: Enriched whole grains are fortified with folic acid and other B vitamins, iron, and zinc. Whole grains contain more fiber and trace nutrients than processed grains, such as white bread, white rice, and white flour.
  • Enjoy: Oatmeal for breakfast, whole-grain breads for sandwiches, brown rice, wild rice, whole-wheat pasta, or quinoa for dinner, popcorn, or whole-grain crackers for snacks

Yogurt (plain low-fat or fat-free)

  • Why: For the protein, calcium, B vitamins, and zinc; plain yogurt contains more calcium than milk.
  • Enjoy: Stir in: fruit preserves or honey, fresh or dried fruit, or crunchy whole-grain cereal. Use plain yogurt to top cooked sweet potatoes or to make smoothies.

 

This information is not intended to replace the advice of a trained medical doctor. ExpressBuyng Ltd disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information, which is provided to you on a general information basis only and not as a substitute for personalized medical advice. 

What Is Tongue Tie in Babies
2018-07-11 11:55:28

To do its job well, your tongueneeds to be able reach almost every part of your mouth. That full range of motion lets you make different sounds when you speak. It also helps you swallow and sweep away bits of food to keep your mouth clean.

ExpressBuy is your (fastest and lowest priced) online retailer that specializes on the sale of Baby Products amongst other things. As a result, we have become experts in understanding everything about Baby from Conception to Birth to Maturity.

We found an interesting article that adequately explains what Is Tongue-Tie in babies.

But for babies with tongue-tie, there’s a problem with something called the lingual frenulum. That’s the small stretch of tissue that connects the underside of your tongue to the bottom of your mouth. It might be too short and tight, or attached way up near the tip of the tongue.

Either way, it ties the tongue in place. For some, it’s not much of an issue. For others, it can lead to problems breastfeeding. Later on, it can affect eating and speaking.

Doctors don’t always check for it, and it’s not always easy to notice. But even if your child’s pediatrician doesn’t find it until later, it can be treated.

Causes

Usually, the lingual frenulum separates from the tongue before your baby is born. But sometimes it doesn’t. Doctors aren’t sure why. It may run in families. We do know that boys are 3 times more likely to get it than girls.

Symptoms

It’s often found because of problems breastfeeding. You may notice your baby:

  • Can’t latch well
  • Tends to chew more than suck
  • Doesn’t gain weight the way you’d expect
  • Feeds for a long time, takes a short break, then feeds for another long stretch
  • Is fussy when trying to feed
  • Makes a clicking sound while feeding
  • Seems hungry all the time

Along with symptoms, you may hurt during and after breastfeeding. You may also have sore or cracked nipples. But tongue-tie isn’t the only reason there may be breastfeeding problems. So if you’re having them, talk to your doctor.

You might also notice your baby’s tongue:

  • Can’t move far from side to side
  • Can’t reach the upper gums or roof of the mouth
  • Can’t stick out past the gums
  • Has a V shape or heart shape at its tip when it’s sticking out

Diagnosis

A physical exam is all it takes to see what’s going on. The doctor will:

  • Ask how feeding is going
  • Check your child’s tongue, mouth, and teeth
  • Use a tongue depressor, which is like a big popsicle stick, to look under your child’s tongue and check the range of motion

The doctor may ask older kids to move their tongue around and make certain sounds, like of an r or l.

Does It Need to Be Treated?

Not all doctors agree on this. Some say to take care of it right away to ward off any issues. Others think it’s better to wait. That’s because it might not cause any problems or may loosen up over time.

There’s no way to know for sure what’ll happen.

If it's not treated, it can also lead to:

  • Dental problems like tooth decay, swollen and irritated gums, and a gap between the lower two front teeth
  • Gagging or choking on foods as your child starts to eat solids
  • A hard time with basic things, like licking an ice cream cone and kissing
  • Trouble saying d, l, n, r, s, t, th, and z sounds. Rolling an r can be especially hard.

Talk it through with your doctor to learn what’s best for you and your baby.

Treatment

There are two ways to take care of tongue-tie:

Frenotomy: This basic procedure happens in a doctor’s office. Sometimes you don't even need numbing drugs.

The doctor takes a pair of specially cleaned scissors and clips the frenulum, which doesn’t have many nerves or blood vessels. That means there’s not much pain. And if there’s any blood at all, it’s a drop or two at most.

Your baby can breastfeed right away, which can be soothing and healing.

Frenuloplasty. When the frenulum is too thick for a quick snip, your pediatrician will choose this option.

The doctor will:

  • Give your child drugs so they sleep through the whole thing
  • Use special tools to cut the frenulum
  • Put in a few stitches that dissolve on their own as the wound heals

Some hospitals may use a laser instead. In that case, your child won’t need stitches.

Are the Treatments Safe?

Both are usually very successful and prevent any speech, dental, or eating problems. It’s rare for either one to cause any issues.

As with any medical procedure though, there are risks, such as:

  • Bleeding
  • Damage to the tongue or the glands that make saliva
  • Infection

A frenuloplasty can also lead to scarring. And your child could have a reaction to the drugs used to help him sleep.

 

This information is not intended to replace the advice of a trained medical doctor. ExpressBuyng Ltd disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information, which is provided to you on a general information basis only and not as a substitute for personalized medical advice. 

 

 

Importance of Pregnancy Massage
2018-07-11 11:20:44

You may think of massage as a luxury to indulge in on occasion. But one of the most beneficial times for massage may be during pregnancy.

ExpressBuy is your (fastest and lowest priced) online retailer that specializes on the sale of Baby Products amongst other things. As a result, we have become experts in understanding everything about Baby from Conception to Birth to Maturity.

We found an interesting article that adequately explains the importance of pregnancy massage.

What Is Pregnancy Massage?

Pregnancy massage is a catch-all term for any hands-on massage during or after pregnancy (prenatal or postnatal massage).

A pregnancy massage typically lasts an hour. Some practitioners use a pregnancy massage table. That's a table designed to accommodate a woman's pregnant belly. Others use specially designed pillows called bolsters to position a woman comfortably on her side. This helps especially during the later stages of pregnancy. Lying on your side is often the most comfortable position.

Possible Benefits of Pregnancy Massage

Only a handful of small studies have focused on massage in pregnancy. No definite benefits have been established. But one study at the University of Miami School of Medicine suggests that massage therapy might have multiple positive effects, including:

  • Lowered anxiety
  • Decreased back and leg pain
  • Improved sleep
  • Decreased levels of the stress hormone norepinephrine

In another study of pregnancy massage in depressed women, researchers found:

  • Increased levels of the "feel-good" hormones serotonin and dopamine
  • Decreased levels of cortisol, an indicator of stress
  • An overall improvement in mood

Research has shown that, for the general population, massage has other potential benefits. It may relieve pain, or it may boost the immune system’s ability to fight off viruses and tumors.

When to Avoid Pregnancy Massage

Because the research on pregnancy massage is scant, many Western-trained doctors advise a conservative approach. They may even advise all pregnant women to avoid massage. There are no scientifically agreed upon guidelines. Be sure you get clearance from your doctor before you try a massage, especially if:

  • You're experiencing nausea, vomiting, or morning sickness
  • You're at high risk of miscarriage
  • You have a high-risk pregnancy such as placental abruption (where the placenta slightly detaches from the wall of the uterus) or preterm labor

A massage therapist may require written consent from your doctor and a liability waiver from you before performing pregnancy massage.

 

This information is not intended to replace the advice of a trained medical doctor. ExpressBuyng Ltd disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information, which is provided to you on a general information basis only and not as a substitute for personalized medical advice. 

Pregnancy and the Flu
2018-07-09 13:43:22

Catching the flu is never good, and especially not when you’re expecting. The illness can be more severe when you’re pregnant, and it may last three times longer in moms-to-be. You may be more likely to get complications like pneumonia, too, that could lead to hospitalization. And a serious flu raises the risk of preterm labour and delivery.

ExpressBuy is your (fastest and lowest priced) online retailer that specializes on the sale of Baby Products amongst other things. As a result, we have become experts in understanding everything about Baby from Conception to Birth to Maturity.

We found an interesting article that adequately explains guidelines recommend a flu shot during pregnancy.

On the bright side, a flu isn’t likely to hurt your baby. And being pregnant doesn’t make you any more likely to get the flu than women your age who aren’t expecting. Best of all, there are easy ways to avoid it and have a healthy pregnancy.

What's the Best Way to Prevent the Flu?

Get a flu shot. The vaccine is the number one way to prevent this illness. You can get the shot no matter how far along you are -- even the third trimester isn’t too late.

Flu season can begin as early as October and last as late as May. October or November is the best time to be vaccinated, but you can get a shot as late as January.

The shot will protect both you and the baby from getting the flu for 6 months after you give birth. This is especially important, because the flu shot isn’t safe for infants less than 6 months old.

If you have had contact with someone who has the flu, your doctor may recommend that you take an antiviral medication as a prevention measure.

Is the Flu Shot Safe?

It doesn’t contain the live virus and can’t give you the flu. You may have fatigue and muscle aches afterward as your immune system responds to the vaccine.

The flu shot is also OK while you’re breastfeeding. It can’t cause you or your nursing baby to get sick. The shot takes about 2 weeks to work.

Pregnant women should not get the nasal flu vaccine.

Where Do You Get a Flu Shot?

The American Lung Association offers an online flu vaccine clinic locator. Visit the site, enter a zip code and a date (or dates), and you’ll get information about clinics in your area.

Pregnant women should not use a nasal flu vaccine called FluMist that contains live but weakened viruses. It has not been tested for safety during pregnancy. In addition, the nasal spray is not recommended for use during the 2017-2018 season because it might not be effective.

How Should I Treat My Symptoms?

There isn’t a lot of research on how over-the-counter medications affect pregnant women. Call your doctor before you take any over-the-counter treatment.

Your doctor may suggest:

  • Acetaminophen , the preferred treatment for fever, aches, and pains
  • Saline nasal spray or nasal irrigation
  • Pseudoephedrine, the decongestant, may be helpful. Avoid it in the first trimester or if you have high blood pressure.

You can usually find these treatments among over-the-counter cold and flu remedies. Check labels carefully.

Your doctor will know what prescription drug you can use. There are 3 to choose from: oseltamivir (Tamiflu), peramivir (Rapivab), or zanamivir(Relenza) in pregnant women with suspected or test-proven flu. Oseltamivir taken by mouth is preferred, because there are studies to show it’s safe and it works.

Are There Any Natural Treatments?

Pregnant women should take antiviral drugs as a first-line treatment. For symptoms, try these four natural flu remedies:

  • Use sugar- or honey-based lozenges to relieve sore throats and coughs.
  • Get plenty of bed rest.
  • Drink lots of fluids, like water, juice, and caffeine-free tea.
  • Put an air humidifier in your room to provide extra moisture, which can help ease congestion.

How Do You Prevent the Flu?

Get a flu shot. Don’t use FluMist, the nasal spray influenza vaccine. It isn’t recommended for pregnant women.

To avoid catching the illness when you’re pregnant:

  • Wash your hands often.
  • Avoid crowds.
  • Stay away from people who have a cold.
  • Don’t touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. Germs are often spread when you touch a contaminated surface and then touch these areas.

When Should You Call the Doctor?

  • You have trouble breathing.
  • Your symptoms don't improve or get worse after 3 to 4 days.
  • After feeling a little better, you start having signs of a more serious problem, like a sick-to-your-stomach feeling, vomiting, high fever, shaking chills, chest pain, or coughing with thick, yellow-green mucus.

This information is not intended to replace the advice of a trained medical doctor. ExpressBuyng Ltd disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information, which is provided to you on a general information basis only and not as a substitute for personalized medical advice. 

 

 

 

 

 

What Pregnancy does to the Eyes
2018-07-09 12:28:25

If you’re expecting, you expect to have morning sickness or lower back pain. But you might be surprised when your vision changes. The hormonal and physical changes that come with pregnancy can also affect your eyesight.

ExpressBuy is your (fastest and lowest priced) online retailer that specializes on the sale of Baby Products amongst other things. As a result, we have become experts in understanding everything about Baby from Conception to Birth to Maturity.

We found an interesting article that adequately explains what pregnancy does to the eyes.

Most issues are usually minor and temporary. Your sight should return to normal after your baby is born. But some problems linked to pregnancy may require medical attention.

Here are four problems to look out for:

Dry Eyes

You may notice that your eyes are drier than usual. This can make your contact lenses irritating.

What to do: Use artificial tears to wet your eyes and ease dryness. If you wear contacts, check the label to make sure the drops can be used with contacts. Some have preservatives that can harm soft contact lenses. Also, talk to your doctor first to make sure the ingredients are safe for pregnant women.

Blurred Vision

Many pregnant women retain fluids. This common side effect can change the thickness and shape of your cornea. That can lead to distorted vision. These changes usually go away after delivery or after you stop breastfeeding.

What to do: You may not need to do anything if the changes don't bother you. If they do, talk to your doctor. You may need to change your prescription if you wear glasses. Most eye experts advise against getting LASIK surgery or being fitted for new contacts during pregnancy. Your eyes will go back to normal when your pregnancy is over.

Preeclampsia

Vision changes can be a sign of this potentially serious problem that occurs in a small number of pregnant women. It’s marked by high blood pressure and signs of damage to another organ. Symptoms include:

  • Temporary loss of vision

  • Light sensitivity

  • Blurry vision

  • Seeing auras, flashing lights, or spots

What to do: If you have any of these symptoms, call your doctor ASAP or go to the ER. Preeclampsia can progress rapidly and cause bleeding and other serious problems.

Diabetes

High blood sugar levels linked to diabetes can damage the small blood vessels that supply your retina. The chances go up as your pregnancy progresses. A temporary form of diabetes that sometimes affects moms-to-be, called gestational diabetes, can also cause blurred vision.

What to do: If you have diabetes, keep close tabs on it while you’re pregnant. If you get gestational diabetes, make sure your blood sugar levels don’t get too high. Your doctor will help.

 

This information is not intended to replace the advice of a trained medical doctor. ExpressBuyng Ltd disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information, which is provided to you on a general information basis only and not as a substitute for personalized medical advice. 

 

When Can Babies Have Meat
2018-06-08 14:33:49

Ready to add a little variety to your baby’s diet? Your little one can eat meat shortly after starting solid foods. Watching for signs of readiness helps you decide when your baby is ready for meats and other solid foods. While most babies are ready around the same time, the exact age can vary depending on your child’s development.

ExpressBuy is your (fastest and lowest priced) online retailer that specializes on the sale of Baby Products amongst other things. As a result, we have become experts in understanding everything about Baby from Conception to Birth to Maturity.

We found an interesting article that adequately explains when can babies have meat.

Introducing Solid Foods

Experts used to recommend starting babies on solid food with single-grain cereals. Cereal is still a good first step into solid food because it’s easy to eat, and you can thin it easily. But experts now say the order in which you introduce solid foods to your baby doesn’t really matter. You can start with cereal, or dive right in with pureed fruits and veggies. Even meat is OK as one of baby’s first foods, as long as it’s pureed to a smooth consistency. Many commercially produced baby foods have meat in the mix, for example.

Babies are usually ready for solid foods between 4 and 6 months of age. Your baby is ready when she meets the following criteria:

  • About double her birth weight
  • Able to hold her head up well
  • Able to sit up mostly unassisted
  • Interest in food
  • Opens her mouth when food comes near
  • Able to move food back into her throat instead of pushing it out

When Can You Add Meat and Fish?

You don’t have to wait until a certain age to introduce meat to your baby. It can be part of a baby food puree you feed him shortly after he starts solids. Keep in mind it’s best to add a single ingredient to your baby’s diet at a time, so you can identify the cause of an allergic reaction if your baby has one.

You can add small pieces of soft, cooked meat to your baby’s diet as soon as he starts eating finger food. You know your little one is ready for finger foods when he sits up on his own and can put objects in his mouth. All finger foods should be cut into very small pieces and should be soft and easy for little ones to swallow.

After a few months of introducing solid foods one at a time, your baby should be worked up to eating a wide range of foods, including meat and fish. Your baby should still get breast milk or formula until age 1.

Why Should You Feed Your Baby Meat?

Meat is a good source of iron and zinc. Babies need lots of iron to develop properly and avoid anaemia, so adding meat to her diet is a good way to supply those nutrients naturally. If your baby is breastfed, iron is particularly important. Introducing baby food containing meat shortly after starting solid food can give your breastfed baby the necessary iron to support development.

What Type of Meat Works Best?

When your baby first starts eating solids, the best meat options are pureed, so your baby can swallow them easily. You can puree your own soft, cooked meats, or choose jarred baby food with meat in it.

Once he starts eating finger foods, offer finely chopped, soft meats, such as chicken, ground meat and turkey. Meatballs and meatloaf cut into tiny pieces work well because the ground meat used in them is soft and easy to eat. Feeding your little one is easy when you also serve those foods to your family. You can give him a smaller serving cut into baby-size pieces without preparing a separate meal. Skip tougher meats such as steak and pork chops. Even in little pieces, they can cause a choking hazard.

Deli meat is a soft meat option that can work for babies when cut into tiny shreds, but note there is a small risk of listeria infection with deli meat. Most people aren’t affected by the rare bacterial infection, but those with weaker immune systems are the most vulnerable. Deli meat is fully cooked when you buy it, but reheating it until it’s steaming hot can help prevent listeria. Let the deli meat cool down after reheating it, so it doesn’t burn your baby’s mouth.

Do Babies Need Meat?

Your baby doesn’t have to eat meat, but you still need to supply the nutrients that meat provides. If you opt to feed your baby a vegetarian diet, zinc and iron are the two primary nutrients you need to replace.

This is particularly important if you’re breastfeeding because your breast milk doesn’t provide enough iron and zinc for babies as they get older. Talk to your doctor if you plan to feed your baby a vegetarian diet. Your baby may need to take iron supplements to prevent a deficiency. Formula-fed babies usually get enough iron since the formula is iron-fortified.

Whether your baby is breastfed or formula-fed, focus on feeding her foods naturally high in zinc and iron. Good options include iron-fortified cereal, other iron-fortified foods, beans, eggs, cooked leafy greens and nut butter. Help your baby’s body absorb the iron better by pairing those items with foods high in vitamin C such as broccoli, tomatoes and citrus.

Work with your child’s doctor if you don’t plan for her to eat meat. Her doctor can keep an eye on her iron levels to ensure she doesn’t develop a deficiency.

 

This information is not intended to replace the advice of a trained medical doctor. ExpressBuyng Ltd disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information, which is provided to you on a general information basis only and not as a substitute for personalized medical advice. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How Dads Can Help With Breastfeeding
2018-06-08 13:58:19

Prior to giving birth to our second son, my husband and I had a serious conversation about him being the gatekeeper for visitors at the hospital. I was inspired by how my sister initiated breastfeeding right away after delivery, and wanted to do the same with our son. My husband’s job was to determine when people came to visit. This allowed me to feel comfortable nursing openly. Little did I know the countless ways of him assisting and supporting me with breastfeeding would be revealed throughout this journey. He provided us with an eternal sense of peace.

ExpressBuy is your (fastest and lowest priced) online retailer that specializes on the sale of Baby Products amongst other things. As a result, we have become experts in understanding everything about Baby from Conception to Birth to Maturity.

We found an interesting article that adequately explains how dads can help with breastfeeding.

I was exhausted the first night at the hospital, because of waking up every 2 ½ hours to feed. My body was tired after giving birth, and sleep deprivation was starting to kick in big time. The last thing I wanted to do was put a hungry baby on my sore breasts. With love and knowing my intentions, my husband was very supportive in getting me water and adjusting my pillow to nurse. Sometimes he felt helpless and indicated that there wasn’t much he could do to assist me with various positions to feed. I felt the same way, until we had a visit from the lactation consultant, Catharine Monet.

Ms. Monet, a certified International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiner, tiptoed into our dim lit room and spoke in a very soft voice. She is petite with coke-bottle glasses, greyish brown hair, and exudes a nurturing spirit. I had just begun nursing as she approached the bedside and glanced down at our baby. Ms. Monet smiled as her voice matched her sweet persona and graceful motions, while reiterating to us the importance of breastfeeding. Intrigued by her wisdom, my intuition was correct in sensing that she had been teaching mothers for years about breastfeeding. In fact, she has worked in the field for over 22 years and believes that “God put the great desire in her to teach mothers how to feed their babies.”

Her guidance and support led me to interview her and to share her knowledge and truth with other moms and dads. Ms. Monet helped my husband feel a part of the breastfeeding experience. Her tips on getting your partner involved with breastfeeding were both useful and powerful. These tips are summarized in her own words.

Communication: When you first think about bringing a new life into the planet, you must remember that communication is important, not only with yourself, but your belief system and partner. Discuss the benefits of breastfeeding with your partner and weigh out the pros and cons. Have an open mind and remember that it doesn’t work for everyone. Don’t feel pressured to nurse. We have had cases where as consultants the father has pushed the mother to breastfeed and she for whatever reason doesn’t have it in her heart or mind to nurse. That puts her in a terrible situation and can be humiliating. It is the best thing for the child, but lots of women end up hiding how they feel, and may sabotage their own breastfeeding. Some women may have a lot of guilt and pain. If dad can be understanding and supportive of what’s in her heart, then they can grow closer together.

Be Supportive: The story of Hannah in the Bible is a good example of a husband being supportive to his wife about wanting to have children and breastfeeding. The story in short is about a woman who asked God to give her children. She was one of two wives, in which the second wife produced sons and daughters. This caused Hannah great grief. She asked God to give her a male child and promised him back to God. The priest told her to sober up. She said, don’t look unkindly unto me, because I’m pouring my heart out to God. Hannah conceived a son, stayed at home and nursed him until she weaned him. Her husband, knowing that they’ve made this promise, was supportive of her decision to stay home until their child was weaned. In other words, the most supportive thing to do is what is best for the mother and child. It is between you, your child and your God. Support her.

It is important for a partner or husband to honor the woman and do what her heart desires. Showing interest in what the woman wants to do is a great gift. Breast milk is more than food. It’s spirit. The relationship itself is designed to create divine communication where the child is able to receive and prepares to receive. With God, we have to be quiet, open our hearts and receive.

The mother is very pleased when the husband or partner tells her that he is supportive and encourages her that she can do it. Bringing the baby to the mother, helping the baby latch, telling the mother the baby is getting relaxed and what the child needs are also helpful.

Attend a breastfeeding seminar: For dads, sit there, look interested, and be supportive. Believe me, you will gain from the experience and build a stronger relationship with your partner.

Online: Get online and learn more about breastfeeding. There are all sorts of information available online to readers.

Focus: Remember that we live in a web of energy and that we are all connected. When you are breastfeeding your baby in the hospital, and if the father or partner (as a support person) is not involved, then in can be difficult. For example, if your partner is focused on TV, reading, on the computer, texting or talking on the phone, then that can be a distraction. Involvement means shutting it all down and encouraging baby. Focus on the breastfeeding time and not on something else.

A husband or partner is not outside of the relationship. He is an integral part of this, and when he pulls back or is not involved it doesn’t go as well. By divine design he shows support, just standing there. What’s cool, after telling him, he gets involved. It’s not just her thing to do. Creatively pull him in and make him see what a big impact he has on the success on this relation. If he helps this relationship develop, then the child has a better relationship. If an environment is created where focus is on mother and baby, and the father or partner is part of that then he can change the bond.

Massage: As a dad, there are things that you can learn about that helps the process: massage, getting snacks, and holding acupressure points at the base of mother’s neck, to help the milk let down. If you have a happy mother, you have a happy baby.

Positioning: Help mom learn what positions are most comfortable for her and baby when breastfeeding. Father and mother should act as a team.

Remember that if you want to breastfeed your child then wonderful! However, if you choose not to breastfeed then that’s OK too. You can still be a wonderful parent without breastfeeding. It usually takes 2-3 weeks until the baby is comfortable. Milk may not come in right always, or breasts may be very sore. It’s difficult in the beginning. However, if your milk supply is good and you want to give it a try, then ask your partner to come along for the journey.

DADS TO DO LIST:

1. Adjust the positioning of the pillow

2. Provide water and food

3. Adjust the lighting in the room

4. Burp the baby

5. Change the baby if needed after feeding

6. Swaddle the baby after feeding and changing

7. Clean / cook

8. Massage

9. Take a shift

10. Encourage with love 

 

This information is not intended to replace the advice of a trained medical doctor. ExpressBuyng Ltd disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information, which is provided to you on a general information basis only and not as a substitute for personalized medical advice. 

 

 

 

Think again before you post online those pics of your kids
2018-06-08 13:21:20

The French government earlier this year warned parents to stop posting images of their children on social media networks.

ExpressBuy is your (fastest and lowest priced) online retailer that specializes on the sale of Baby Products amongst other things. As a result, we have become experts in understanding everything about Baby from Conception to Birth to Maturity.

We found an interesting article that adequately explains the dangers associated in posting images of your children online.

You might think it’s cute to snap a photo of your toddler running around in a playground or having a temper tantrum, and then posting it on social media. But did you ever think it might be a mistake, or even illegal?

Under France’s rigorous privacy laws, parents could face penalties of up to a year in prison and a fine of €45,000 (A$64,500) if convicted of publicising intimate details of their children without their consent.

This new legality is powerful food for thought for parenting in the Facebook era. As adults, we often express dissatisfaction at the ways young people post their lives online. But if we turn the mirror on ourselves, do we as parents actually have the right to make our family photos public? If so, which ones?

Sharing pictures

Part of the issue is our tendency for over-sharing. A recent study by Nominet, which handles the UK’s .uk domain name registry, found that parents post nearly 200 photos of their under fives online every year.

This means that a child will feature in around 1,000 online photos before their fifth birthday. We’ve even got to the point where if you don’t upload photos of our baby, others question whether you are a committed parent.

This new norm means that many children will have a powerful digital identity created by someone else. This process can be likened to the manufacturing of celebrity identities, where parents can potentially shape the public persona of their child in any way they want: child genius, disobedient, fashionista, fussy eater and so on.

How do you think your own mum or dad might shape your online identity? Do you think it would be an accurate portrayal of who you are?

There is also the issue of Likes and comments on those photos. Without realising it, are we choosing to upload posts about our kids that we hope will get the most audience attention? If so, how is this skewing the identity we are shaping for them?

The web never forgets

We often tell our kids that once something is on the internet it is there forever, and this is a core concern for kids. Research shows that parents often haven’t considered the potential reach and the longevity of the digital information that they’re sharing about their child.

Your child won’t have much control over where that home video of her having an embarrassing first singing lesson ends up or who sees it.

And for this generation of kids, the publicising of their lives can start even before they are born when parents broadcast photos to all their friends and their friends’ friends of the antenatal scan.

Parents’ actions are generally not maliciously intended. In fact, they actually often see they are exposing something personal about their own life in such posts rather than that of their child.

There’s also benefit from such sharing. Posts about your child bed-wetting might help a friend find solutions, or boost their patience for dealing with a similar issue with their own child. Many parents find this community of support important.

Given the relative youth of social media, it’s hard to say exactly how growing up online could affect children’s privacy, safety and security. But social media has also been around long enough now (Facebook is now 14 years old) that it’s important to seriously consider the issue.

It’s time to question how individuals (both children and adults) should manage boundaries around sharing personal information, and how they can control information that is shared about them.

Posting embarrassing photos of others on Facebook without consent is definitely tricky territory, but what constitutes embarrassing is slightly different for everyone, which makes this new issue even more of a minefield.

Get the kids involved

The answer of how to approach this new-found issue might be to listen to what kids have to say about it. Recent research from the University of Michigan asked children and parents to describe the rules they thought families should follow related to technology.

Adults tend to think of these rules around how much time kids spend on screen, but about three times more children than parents thought there should be rules about what parents share and don’t share on social media. Many kids said parents should not post anything about them on online without asking them.

Both children and parents considered positive images, events and news more appropriate to share than negative ones. An image of the child playing on the swings at the park is a lot less likely to resurface than a YouTube video of them having a tantrum because their breakfast is not in their favourite bowl.

If you’re a parent looking for advice or sympathy about a behavioural problem, then a community approach is still very helpful, just don’t post an image and your child’s name as part of the post. This will help to limit the searchability and reach of it.

Asking your children’s consent is also part of the issue and part of the solution. Asking if your child likes the photos of them and whether you can put it up online can be a very quick and respectful conversation. It also sets up a great approach to your kids understanding digital etiquette.

Parents sharing photos of their kids online isn’t only about digital identity. It’s also about our obsession with taking photos of our kids, particularly when they shine (or don’t shine) in their respective activities.

This can make kids feel pressured to perform to help mum and dad get the right snap to share. What the children really want to see is you taking notice of them and acknowledging that they and their actions are important.

 

This information is not intended to replace the advice of a trained medical doctor. ExpressBuyng Ltd disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information, which is provided to you on a general information basis only and not as a substitute for personalized medical advice. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fasting in pregnancy
2018-06-08 12:06:45

There's no clear answer. Despite research, we can't be sure that fasting is safe for you and your baby. 


If you're pregnant, Islamic law doesn't require you to fast. You can make up missed fasts later, or do fidyah, which is a way of compensating for your missed fasts. For example, you could donate to a food bank. 

 

ExpressBuy is your (fastest and lowest priced) online retailer that specializes on the sale of Baby Products amongst other things. As a result, we have become experts in understanding everything about Baby from Conception to Birth to Maturity.

 

We found an interesting article that adequately explains if fasting is safe in pregnancy.

 

Is fasting safe for my baby?

 

However, if you wish to fast, it appears to be safer for you and your baby if you feel strong, and if your pregnancy is going well. 

If you don't feel well enough to fast, or are worried about your health or your baby's wellbeing, talk to your GP or midwife and get a general health check before deciding to fast. 

One factor is when the fast takes place. If Ramadan coincides with summer, this means hot weather and long days, which puts you at greater risk of dehydration. 

 

What do studies into fasting in pregnancy show?

 

Some studies show little or no effect on newborn babies whose mums fasted in pregnancy. Others suggest health problems later in life, or that fasting in pregnancy may have some effect on the intelligence or academic ability of a child. 

Here’s what the research has told us so far:

 

 

  • The Apgar score of babies of women who fasted in pregnancy was no different from babies of women who didn't fast.

 

  • Fasting in pregnancy may cause a baby to have a lower birth weight, especially if the fasting took place in the first trimester. However, other studies found the difference in birth weight to be very small.

 

  • Babies born to mums who fasted either in pregnancy or at the time of conception may grow up to be slightly shorter and thinner. But again, this difference is very small.

 

  • The chemical balance of the blood changes when you fast. But the changes don't appear to be harmful to you or your baby.

There's some concern that fasting may affect how well a baby grows in the uterus (womb), or that fasting may be linked to premature labour. Some studies suggest that more babies are born early if their mums fast during Ramadan, though the country you live in also plays a part.

 

How will I cope with fasting?

 

If your weight and lifestyle are generally healthy you are likely to cope better with fasting. Your baby needs nutrients from you, and if your body has enough energy stores, fasting is likely to have less of an impact. 

 

How your body deals with fasting will also depend on:

 

  • your general health before you became pregnant

  • your stage of pregnancy

  • the length of time you fast during the day

Fasting in the summer months is likely to be harder work for you than it would be in the winterdue to the longer days and higher temperatures.

 

What do other women do?

 

According to some studies, about three quarters of pregnant Muslim women worldwide choose to fast for Ramadan. But everyone has their own way of observing Ramadan. 

Most Islamic leaders say that you should fast if you are healthy enough to do so. But they also say that if you are unwell you mustn't fast. You shouldn't ignore this special permission if you feel unwell, or if you fear that fasting could harm you or your baby. 

 

Only you can judge how healthy you feel, and what the right decision is for you. Talk to your family, midwife or doctor, and an Islamic sheikh, to help you to consider your options.

 

How should I prepare for fasting?

 

Plan ahead to make things easier during Ramadan:

 

  • Talk to your midwife, who can check your health and for any possible complications that fasting makes you more prone to, such as diabetes (gestational diabetes) and anaemia. You may need to have more frequent check-ups during your fast to monitor your blood sugar levels. Fasting is not considered to be safe if you have diabetes and are pregnant. 

  • If you're used to having a lot of caffeinated drinks, such as coffee, tea and cola, cut back before you fast to prevent withdrawal headaches. You shouldn't have more than 200mg of caffeine a day when you are pregnant, which is about two cups of instant coffee. Remember that chocolate and green tea also contain some caffeine.

  • Talk to your employer about managing your work during Ramadan, whether through reducing your working hours or having extra breaks. Read more about working and fasting.

  • Your doctor, midwife or a dietitian can help you to work out your dietary needs.

  • Keep a food diary, so you know what you are eating and drinking.

  • Start preparing early by doing shopping and errands before you fast.

 

What warning signs should I look out for?

 

Contact your doctor as soon as possible if:

  • You're not putting on enough weight, or are losing weight. You probably won't be weighed during your antenatal appointments, so try to weigh yourself regularly at home while you are fasting.

  • You become very thirsty, are weeing less frequently, or if your wee becomes dark-coloured and strong-smelling. This is a sign of dehydration, and it can make you more prone to urinary tract infections (UTIs) or other complications.

  • You develop a headache or other pains, or a fever.

  • You become nauseous or start vomiting.

  • You should contact your doctor straight away if:

  • There is a noticeable change in your baby’s movements, such as if your baby is not moving around or kicking as much.

  • You notice contraction-like pains. This could be a sign of premature labour.

  • You feel dizzy, faint, weak, confused or tired, even after you have had a good rest. Break your fast immediately and drink water containing salt and sugar, or an oral rehydration solution such as Dioralyte, and contact the doctor.

How can I make fasting in pregnancy easier?

  • Keep calm and avoid stressful situations. Changes in your routine, a lack of food and water, and eating and drinking at different times, can cause stress. Pregnant women who fasted during Ramadan were found to have higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol in their blood than women who didn't fast.

  • Take things easy, and accept help when it is offered. Even if your family and friends stay up late, you may need to mark this Ramadan with more quiet, restful time.

  • Ask family or friends who have fasted while being pregnant for tips and suggestions.

  • Keep cool, as you may become dehydrated quickly, which isn't good for you or your baby.

  • Plan your days so you can take regular rests.

  • Try not to walk long distances or carry anything heavy.

  • Cut down on housework and anything that tires you out.

What's the best way to break my fast?

 

Choose a variety of healthy foods and have plenty to drink at Suhoor (pre-dawn meal) and Iftar (meal taken at dusk). Have a healthy bedtime snack too, and set your alarm clock if you need to, so you don't miss your pre-dawn meal.

  • Choose foods that release energy slowly. Complex carbohydrates, such as wholegrains and seeds, and high-fibre foods, such as pulses, vegetables and dried fruits, will help to keep you going. This will also help to prevent constipation.

  • Avoid having lots of sugary foods that will raise your blood sugar levels quickly. Your blood sugar may then drop quickly, which may make you feel faint and dizzy.

  • Rather than high-fat, refined foods, choose healthier options such as potatoes or chickpeas.

  • Make sure you get plenty of protein from beans, nuts and well-cooked meat and eggs. This will help your baby to grow well.

  • Try to drink about 1.5 litres to 2 litres of water or other fluids between dusk and dawn, and avoid caffeinated drinks such as tea and coffee. Caffeine makes you lose more water when you wee, so you may be more likely to become dehydrated, especially if the weather is hot. 

 

I'm still not sure if I should fast. What should I do?

 

Ask your midwife to give you a general health check before you begin. An Islamic sheikh will probably suggest getting medical advice to help you to make your decision. Consider trying a trial fast for a day or so, see how you feel, and then go back to your midwife or GP for a check-up.

 

 

 

This information is not intended to replace the advice of a trained medical doctor. ExpressBuyng Ltd disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information, which is provided to you on a general information basis only and not as a substitute for personalized medical advice. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teaching our children not to covet
2018-06-08 11:29:54

Money, electronics, clothes, toys . . . kids learn from a young age to covet material things. How can parents teach their kids not to obsess over things they can't have?

ExpressBuy is your (fastest and lowest priced) online retailer that specializes on the sale of Baby Products amongst other things. As a result, we have become experts in understanding everything about Baby from Conception to Birth to Maturity.

We found an interesting article that adequately explains how to teach our children not to covet.

To me, the word “covet” conjures images of dollar signs, sparkly diamonds, name-brand bags and clothes and grand houses with lots of shiny new cars parked out front. I imagine that a covetous person longs for a lavish life of extravagance.

But when I desire more attainable things, like new books, a decadent piece of chocolate cake or a cool bracelet, am I in danger of coveting?

To covet means “to desire wrongfully, inordinately, or without due regard for the rights of others,” or, “to wish for, especially eagerly.” (Dictionary.com) Some words associated with coveting include greed, lust, desire, jealousy and envy.

The Lord commands us, “Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour’s house, thou shalt not covet thy neighbour’s wife, nor his manservant, nor his maidservant, nor his ox, nor his ass, nor any thing that is thy neighbour’s.” (KJV Exodus 20:17)

The emphasis in this commandment regarding covetous behaviour is desiring something that belongs to someone else. So, I think I’m safe to wish for the books, cake or bracelet so long as they’re not my neighbour’s. And as long as I don’t obsess over them or get carried away by greed.

From the time they’re small, children are bombarded by the media and clever advertisers. They see all the colourful and enticing toys that could be theirs. They start to demand what they don’t have. As kids grow, items such as electronic gadgets or new clothes usually replace their desire for toys.

Sadly, many people, including kids, feel defined by their belongings. It’s hard not to. Wearing the “right” clothes can become more important than developing attributes like integrity and moral character. As parents, it’s not entirely our fault — it’s just the way the world has become. Unless we keep our kids sheltered away, their peers, and what they own, heavily influence them.

How can we teach our kids not to covet what their friends have?

Be an example

If we complain about our friend’s new car or compare the size of our house to our neighbour’s, our children will pick up on our cues. Try to grumble in private, or — even better — swallow that envy. Don’t be jealous in front of your kids or they’ll be sure to model your behaviour.

Show your kids how much they do have

By volunteering at a shelter or collecting household items, clothing or food to donate, we can teach our kids to count their blessings. When they understand how fortunate they are compared to so many, their perspectives will change. Serving the less fortunate brings true Help your kids focus on non-material things

When their self-esteem is dependent on their possessions, kids become superficial and greedy. Their confidence lacks a solid foundation. As they take pride in their individual abilities (dancing, running, cooking, painting, singing, swimming or helping others) they develop confidence based on their worth as human beings. They develop skills and attributes that will help them through life.

Helping our kids become well-rounded, grateful for their blessings and empathetic to those less fortunate will help curb their desire for material things and others’ possessions.

joy, as opposed to the fleeting excitement of a new purchase. As your kids help others, they will learn the difference.

 This information is not intended to replace the advice of a trained medical doctor. ExpressBuyng Ltd disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information, which is provided to you on a general information basis only and not as a substitute for personalized medical advice. 

 

 


Full Details

Loading…